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Helper IV Helper IV
Helper IV

Advice on a new article on an innovative business model

Would love your feedback on a new article I wrote on an innovation in business modeling for consulting/agencies.  It's published by ManageWP.com

 

Here's how the article starts:

Website care plans (aka web maintenance plans) are one of the standard business models chosen by web professionals today. With a website care plan customers have access to part-time web professionals who ensure their websites are running in top shape. In this article I will extend website care plans way beyond their current scope and make a case for business success plans.



Alex Sirota, PMP - NewPath Consulting - Schedule some time with Alex
"At the moment of commitment, the universe conspires to assist you." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
4 REPLIES 4
Helper I
Helper I

Re: Advice on a new article on an innovative business model

a good, relate able read.

as someone who offers these services i spend my life dealing with the "what if we could" or my fav "can we just add a tick box" - yeah i have just add a tick box but do you realise how long it will take to add and make it do something? it not the 2 mins your thinking!!! I spend too much time trying to prioritise and push back tasks to the following months allowances only to be chased on why they haven't been finished in the original time scope.

 

 

If i have helped go ahead and give a 'Thumbs Up'!
Helper IV Helper IV
Helper IV

Re: Advice on a new article on an innovative business model

@SupportMyTech thanks for your thoughts... So do you offer a maintenance plan or a business success plan as I have outlined?

 

The business requirements almost never relate to a technical implementation. And what's more damning is that the business requirements sometimes are contrary or don't help the business objectives since the underlying assumptions are not clear or related to actual business needs. The requirements are often subjective based on "feeling" rather than actual data.

 

In the end, it's the risk balance that needs to be struck.



Alex Sirota, PMP - NewPath Consulting - Schedule some time with Alex
"At the moment of commitment, the universe conspires to assist you." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Highlighted
New

Re: Advice on a new article on an innovative business model

Nice topic. This service is a great business model because it is desperately needed. I think first is getting clients to understand that a website is not something you can have a "set it and forget it" attitude about.  There has to be updates, backups, and possibly additional database backups. And of course, there is ensuring you plan ahead for domain, hosting, and SSL renewal, maintain the certificate and get it reissued if needed, etc. Ensuring that a client has the proper SSL installed and that they are compliant in protecting sensitive data is huge. It's clear for e-commerce as a necessity, but other types of applications and forms also collect data that needs to be protected.

 

One major issue with small business clients is that they do not know how to leverage a website to promote and grow their business, so they tend to feel it isn't that much of a benefit. A website is more than just an expensive business card. Tools can be added for CRM, e-commerce, accounting, time management,  scheduling, HR, and more. The website content and additional applications should move hand in hand with the actual business plan. If you don't HAVE a business plan, how do you know if the site is successful? Presenting value to clients can help encourage them to re-hire you for additional services, beyond the routine updates and backups. Just be aware that scope creep can suck up your time, once the clients realize how many options are available.

New

Re: Advice on a new article on an innovative business model


@Alex-NewPath wrote:

@SupportMyTech thanks for your thoughts... So do you offer a maintenance plan or a business success plan as I have outlined?

 

The business requirements almost never relate to a technical implementation. And what's more damning is that the business requirements sometimes are contrary or don't help the business objectives since the underlying assumptions are not clear or related to actual business needs. The requirements are often subjective based on "feeling" rather than actual data.

 

In the end, it's the risk balance that needs to be struck.


Yes, this seems to be a huge issue. I am currently bidding on a large project where the potential client really has no clue how to correctly implement their site, or what specific security requirements are there, how to leverage subdomains, has no encryption plan, not a clue. They know they want a professional look. They have created some content, and have some website examples, but beyond this, they really don't know what is available for CMS, social media applications, and so much more. Once they have their eyes opened, I think it is going to be awesome. But actual business needs analysis and goals alignment is probably more important than looking at the eye candy on a sample website and saying "Give me something like this."